Posts Tagged ‘Load Balancing’

I was recently asked to show an example of how Windows Server 2012 running Internet Information Service (IIS) 8 can scale out in an OpenStack environment. I accepted the challenge and this post is the result.  To accomplish the task, I did a default install of an evaluation version of Windows Server 2012 and installed/configured IIS8 along with ASP.net support.  I then created a very simple web page that uses server variables and the current date an time to create some dynamic content.  Lastly, I installed the CloudBase Cloud-Init service so that Windows Server could talk to the OpenStack metadata service.  I hope you enjoy the video. (more…)

If you are a fan of OpenStack, then I am sure that you have heard of the new Load Balancer as a Service (LBaaS) features of Neutron (formerly Quantum).  As the name indicates, it allows an OpenStack user to configure a load balancer for virtual machines running in OpenStack with relative ease.  I used Red Hat’s OpenStack and noticed that LBaaS is included, but not configured by default.  The goal of this post will be to walk you through the configuration changes that need to take place on an operational OpenStack install and demonstrate how to load balance two web servers.

My Lab Setup

First, let me talk a bit about my OpenStack lab environment.  It is small, just a couple of servers.  The controller, named openstack-ctrl, runs as a virtual machine in a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization environment and provides all of the supporting services (mysql, qpid, Keystone, Cinder, Glance, Nova-API and Horizon)  in OpenStack along with the Quantum server.  A physical server, named server3, acts as a Nova Compute node and also hosts the Quantum L3, DHCP and metadata services.

I have the following networks configured in OpenStack:

Internal (Private): 10.0.0.0/24 – this network is used for DHCP as well
External (Public): 192.168.1.0/24 – this network is for connectivity to the external network.
A floating IP range available from 192.168.1.130-143

The web servers that I am using to show how the LBaaS works have been preconfigured with a unique hostname and a php page that returns the hostname of the server that is responding to the request.  The web servers do not need a floating IP assigned to them. (more…)